gardenchatter

Garden adventures and advice…

Amaryllis Part 2

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Success! Within a week, the bulb began to sprout and within four, the plant began to bloom. It looks great.

This one developed two stalks and there is a third one on the way.

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Now – how to get these to bloom again next year…

1) Keep it cool throughout the blooming period, 60F, and limit the water.

2) Cut the stalks just above the top of the bulb once the floral display is over.  A sappy fluid may run out of the top after cutting, but that just indicates the plant was well watered and is normal.

3) Increase fertilization, light and water. Now it’s in the growth stage and leaves will develop to help feed the bulb for the following year. Find a bright spot, fertilize monthly with a water soluble and keep it damp but not waterlogged.

4) Once the risk of frost is over for your area, move the amaryllis outside. Some leaves may drop off due to the adjustment from indoors to out, but more leaves will soon begin to develop. Keep it in a sunny spot, and continue to water it regularly. Don’t let it dry out.

5) For holiday blooms, the dormant period needs to begin late September (or adjust the dormant period according to when you would like to see blooms). Stop watering and fertilizing, cut the foliage off and move the plant to a cool area – 55F tops.

6) Keep it there until it shows signs of getting ready to grow again. Water lightly, but keep the bulb on the dry side. After about ten weeks of cool storage, new flower stalks will start to emerge.

7) Repot (or not, but either way add some fresh potting soil) and with any luck, you’ll enjoy the same floral show that you experienced the previous year.

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Author: gardenchatter

I'm a Horticulturalist, Master Gardener and member of the Garden Writers Association who enjoys playing in the dirt and experimenting with different veggies, plants and flowers in my Zone 5 garden. Check out my website http://www.wowmygarden.ca With a recent addition of a greenhouse, my newest passion is growing-your-own. And what fun that is. Yes, there's the odd failure, but there's nothing quite as satisfying as walking through the veggie patch collecting dinner.

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